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Music Therapy and Relaxation Therapy for Depression

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Updated: May 23rd 2019

Music therapy

There is some limited evidence that suggests music therapy may provide an improvement in mood.

The Evidence Base

The evidence base on efficacy of music therapy for depression consists of a few randomized trials and a few systematic reviews.

Efficacy

Findings from a 2008 Cochrane review (link is external) of five studies suggest that music therapy is accepted by people with depression and is associated with improvements in mood. However, because evidence is limited by the small number and low methodological quality of studies, its effectiveness remains unclear.

Safety

There are no adverse effects associated with music therapy.

Relaxation Training

Evidence suggests that relaxation training is better than no treatment in reducing symptoms of self-reported depression, but is not as beneficial as psychological therapies.

The Evidence Base

The evidence base on efficacy of relaxation training for depression consists of several randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials and a 2008 Cochrane review.

Efficacy

A 2008 Cochrane review (link is external) of 11 studies found that relaxation techniques were more effective at reducing self-rated symptoms of depression than no or minimal treatment, but they were not as effective as a psychological intervention.

Safety

Relaxation techniques are generally considered safe for healthy people. However, occasionally, people report unpleasant experiences such as increased anxiety, intrusive thoughts, or fear of losing control.

There have been rare reports that certain relaxation techniques might cause or worsen symptoms in people with epilepsy or certain psychiatric conditions, or with a history of abuse or trauma.


Sourced from a National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health publication on May 23, 2019

 

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    Thanks for the post! - depression treatment - Nov 3rd 2009

    Thanks for the post! Deep breathing exercises are excellent for anxiety and many people report positive results from meditation. Some other natural anxiety remedies to look into are St.John's Wort, SAMe, L-Theanine, and Tryptophan. 

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    Placebo Effect - Lura - May 3rd 2009

    I'm fascinated by people's skepticism of various treatments based on the placebo effct - if it helps, does it matter how? i wouldn't care if i spent my whole life treated by a sugar pill, if it helped me just because I thought it would. it would be alot better for my kidneys and liver!

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