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Dana Vince, M.A.Dana Vince, M.A., LPC, MHSP
A blog about mental and emotional health

Why Do We Fight?

Dana Vince, M.A., LPC, MHSP Updated: Oct 29th 2010

I see a lot of couples, and it is quite common in marriage, to get into fights about nothing. It seems you are fighting all the time about little things that after a while, you don’t even remember how it started. Usually when a couple finds themselves fighting a lot, there are issues beneath the surface that are not being addressed. In this article I will discuss one common theme among fighting couples.

fighting coupleThink of the saying, “the opposite of love is not hate, it is indifference”. What does this mean? When there is love and when there is hate, there is connection. When there is indifference there is no connection. To further explain, if I can push your buttons and get a reaction out of you, then I know you care. I know I can get to you, reach you somehow. But if I get no reaction, if you are indifferent, that is a whole other story. In relationships, we all need to know that our partner cares. We want to feel we matter in the lives of one another. So what happens if I am feeling like I don’t matter?

Isolation is among the most painful of human experiences. The most severe punishment for inmates is to be put in isolation. To be ignored, or to feel alone, this is what we ward against. We are wired for human connection.

So now think about your intimate relationship. In order to feel connected, we must allow ourselves to be vulnerable. To feel in tune with our partner, we must open ourselves up to be seen. Well this can be very scary. So what might we do instead? If I don’t want to be vulnerable, but I still want to be connected, I’ll fight.

Often when couples want to feel noticed, cared for, not ignored, instead of being vulnerable to get this from their partner, they will start a fight. This way I don’t have to be exposed, but I still know you care about me because you are reacting to me.

This is an important concept to understand if you are going to make changes to improve the health of your relationship. Many times couples are not aware that this is why they are fighting. They want desperately to be connected, but don’t want to take the necessary and vulnerable risks to do so, so they connect in a protected way, by fighting.

So how do you break out of this? Awareness is the first step. To begin to look at the fights from a different angle. See their purpose, to connect. Then see the consequences of connecting in this way. While it may protect you, it deteriorates the foundation of the relationship, it does damage. So by understanding that you are seeking to connect with each other, you can begin to take the courageous steps of being vulnerable with your partner. You and your partner have to work together to create a safe environment where you can share openly with each other without fear of judgment, criticism or rejection. Once you feel that sense of emotional safety, you can then communicate in ways that build intimacy and connection without damaging the relationship.

If you are struggling to make these changes in your relationship, marriage counseling can help.

www.healingheartscounseling.org/marriage-counseling

Dana Vince, M.A., LPC, MHSP

I help people who love each other learn to get along with each other.

Your relationship with your spouse is the most important relationship you have. Yet it can be the most difficult to maintain. It’s a common question to ask why we hurt the ones we love the most. It’s because it’s where we are most vulnerable, and with vulnerability comes fear. In order for a relationship to be healthy, there must be a sense of emotional safety for both partners to be open enough with each other to feel connected and create a sense of deeper intimacy. Emotional safety requires compassion for one another, respect and emotional responsiveness to one another’s feelings and needs. It can be very difficult for couples to achieve this and reach the level of satisfaction in the relationship they desire.

In counseling couples, I focus on teaching how to communicate in ways that build a safe emotional environment, while allowing for authenticity that creates stronger intimacy and connection. The counseling process can not only help you overcome the challenges you are facing right now, but also give you the skills and understanding to manage any challenge that comes along in the future.

www.healingheartscounseling.org
1-865-283-1777

Call Dana Vince for a Free phone consultation. Daytime and Evening hours are available.

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